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Heart-tugging tales of crowdfunded cancer ‘cures’ fuel quack medicine

Genetics - Fri, 2018-09-14 14:30
Media stories about people with cancer seeking controversial cures are unwittingly bolstering unscientific and potentially harmful treatments, says Michael Marshall
Categories: Biology

Heart-tugging tales of crowdfunded cancer ‘cures’ fuel quack medicine

HIV and AIDS - Fri, 2018-09-14 14:30
Media stories about people with cancer seeking controversial cures are unwittingly bolstering unscientific and potentially harmful treatments, says Michael Marshall

Iran’s Pompeii: Astounding story of a massacre buried for millennia

Genetics - Fri, 2018-09-14 13:00
The ancient town of Hasanlu was under savage attack when a chance event meant every detail was frozen in time. Finally the story can be told, and the assailants unmasked
Categories: Biology

Iran’s Pompeii: Astounding story of a massacre buried for millennia

Genetically modified organisms (GMO) - Fri, 2018-09-14 13:00
The ancient town of Hasanlu was under savage attack when a chance event meant every detail was frozen in time. Finally the story can be told, and the assailants unmasked
Categories: Science and society

New Scientist Live: space is full of junk and we must clean up our act

Genetically modified organisms (GMO) - Fri, 2018-09-14 12:30
Earth orbit is littered with old satellites and debris. At New Scientist Live next week, Hugh Lewis will explain how big the problem is – and how we can fix it
Categories: Science and society

New Scientist Live: space is full of junk and we must clean up our act

Genetics - Fri, 2018-09-14 12:30
Earth orbit is littered with old satellites and debris. At New Scientist Live next week, Hugh Lewis will explain how big the problem is – and how we can fix it
Categories: Biology

We’ve found a pulsar spinning so slowly that it shouldn’t exist

Genetics - Fri, 2018-09-14 11:24
Radio pulsars sweep beams of radiation across space like interstellar lighthouses as they spin, and now we’ve found one that breaks all the rules
Categories: Biology

We’ve found a pulsar spinning so slowly that it shouldn’t exist

HIV and AIDS - Fri, 2018-09-14 11:24
Radio pulsars sweep beams of radiation across space like interstellar lighthouses as they spin, and now we’ve found one that breaks all the rules

We’ve found a pulsar spinning so slowly that it shouldn’t exist

Genetically modified organisms (GMO) - Fri, 2018-09-14 11:24
Radio pulsars sweep beams of radiation across space like interstellar lighthouses as they spin, and now we’ve found one that breaks all the rules
Categories: Science and society

AI tries bad improv comedy to trick people into thinking it is human

Genetics - Fri, 2018-09-14 10:00
Artificial intelligence has joined forces with a group of actors to create spontaneous comedy sketches on stage. The result is a new variant of the Turing test
Categories: Biology

AI tries bad improv comedy to trick people into thinking it is human

HIV and AIDS - Fri, 2018-09-14 10:00
Artificial intelligence has joined forces with a group of actors to create spontaneous comedy sketches on stage. The result is a new variant of the Turing test

AI tries bad improv comedy to trick people into thinking it is human

Genetically modified organisms (GMO) - Fri, 2018-09-14 10:00
Artificial intelligence has joined forces with a group of actors to create spontaneous comedy sketches on stage. The result is a new variant of the Turing test
Categories: Science and society

Acid is dribbling out of the melting permafrost in the Arctic

Genetics - Fri, 2018-09-14 09:00
As climate change thaws the Arctic permafrost, some of it is releasing sulphuric acid – which destroys limestone and releases even more climate-warming carbon dioxide
Categories: Biology

Acid is dribbling out of the melting permafrost in the Arctic

HIV and AIDS - Fri, 2018-09-14 09:00
As climate change thaws the Arctic permafrost, some of it is releasing sulphuric acid – which destroys limestone and releases even more climate-warming carbon dioxide

Acid is dribbling out of the melting permafrost in the Arctic

Genetically modified organisms (GMO) - Fri, 2018-09-14 09:00
As climate change thaws the Arctic permafrost, some of it is releasing sulphuric acid – which destroys limestone and releases even more climate-warming carbon dioxide
Categories: Science and society

Correction: Genome Sequence of the Pea Aphid <i>Acyrthosiphon pisum</i>

PLOS Biology (new articles) - Thu, 2018-09-13 23:00

by The International Aphid Genomics Consortium

Categories: Biology, Journals

Refined RIP-seq protocol for epitranscriptome analysis with low input materials

PLOS Biology (new articles) - Thu, 2018-09-13 23:00

by Yong Zeng, Shiyan Wang, Shanshan Gao, Fraser Soares, Musadeqque Ahmed, Haiyang Guo, Miranda Wang, Junjie Tony Hua, Jiansheng Guan, Michael F. Moran, Ming Sound Tsao, Housheng Hansen He

N6-Methyladenosine (m6A) accounts for approximately 0.2% to 0.6% of all adenosine in mammalian mRNA, representing the most abundant internal mRNA modifications. m6A RNA immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (MeRIP-seq) is a powerful technique to map the m6A location transcriptome-wide. However, this method typically requires 300 μg of total RNA, which limits its application to patient tumors. In this study, we present a refined m6A MeRIP-seq protocol and analysis pipeline that can be applied to profile low-input RNA samples from patient tumors. We optimized the key parameters of m6A MeRIP-seq, including the starting amount of RNA, RNA fragmentation, antibody selection, MeRIP washing/elution conditions, methods for RNA library construction, and the bioinformatics analysis pipeline. With the optimized immunoprecipitation (IP) conditions and a postamplification rRNA depletion strategy, we were able to profile the m6A epitranscriptome using 500 ng of total RNA. We identified approximately 12,000 m6A peaks with a high signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio from 2 lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) patient tumors. Through integrative analysis of the transcriptome, m6A epitranscriptome, and proteome data in the same patient tumors, we identified dynamics at the m6A level that account for the discordance between mRNA and protein levels in these tumors. The refined m6A MeRIP-seq method is suitable for m6A epitranscriptome profiling in a limited amount of patient tumors, setting the ground for unraveling the dynamics of the m6A epitranscriptome and the underlying mechanisms in clinical settings.
Categories: Biology, Journals

Integrative proteomics and bioinformatic prediction enable a high-confidence apicoplast proteome in malaria parasites

PLOS Biology (new articles) - Thu, 2018-09-13 23:00

by Michael J. Boucher, Sreejoyee Ghosh, Lichao Zhang, Avantika Lal, Se Won Jang, An Ju, Shuying Zhang, Xinzi Wang, Stuart A. Ralph, James Zou, Joshua E. Elias, Ellen Yeh

Malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.) and related apicomplexan pathogens contain a nonphotosynthetic plastid called the apicoplast. Derived from an unusual secondary eukaryote–eukaryote endosymbiosis, the apicoplast is a fascinating organelle whose function and biogenesis rely on a complex amalgamation of bacterial and algal pathways. Because these pathways are distinct from the human host, the apicoplast is an excellent source of novel antimalarial targets. Despite its biomedical importance and evolutionary significance, the absence of a reliable apicoplast proteome has limited most studies to the handful of pathways identified by homology to bacteria or primary chloroplasts, precluding our ability to study the most novel apicoplast pathways. Here, we combine proximity biotinylation-based proteomics (BioID) and a new machine learning algorithm to generate a high-confidence apicoplast proteome consisting of 346 proteins. Critically, the high accuracy of this proteome significantly outperforms previous prediction-based methods and extends beyond other BioID studies of unique parasite compartments. Half of identified proteins have unknown function, and 77% are predicted to be important for normal blood-stage growth. We validate the apicoplast localization of a subset of novel proteins and show that an ATP-binding cassette protein ABCF1 is essential for blood-stage survival and plays a previously unknown role in apicoplast biogenesis. These findings indicate critical organellar functions for newly discovered apicoplast proteins. The apicoplast proteome will be an important resource for elucidating unique pathways derived from secondary endosymbiosis and prioritizing antimalarial drug targets.
Categories: Biology, Journals

Half the planet should be set aside for wildlife – to save ourselves

HIV and AIDS - Thu, 2018-09-13 21:00
If we want to avoid extinctions and preserve the ecosystems all life depends on, half of the Earth’s land and oceans should be protected by 2050, say biologists

Watch this robotic fruit fly swoop, dive and perform impressive flips

HIV and AIDS - Thu, 2018-09-13 21:00
DelFly is a robot that flies through a room with as much agility as a real fly using its flappy wings. It is also helping researchers understand how insects move