Nucleic Acids Research

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Structural insight into DNA-assembled oligochromophores: crystallographic analysis of pyrene- and phenanthrene-modified DNA in complex with BpuJI endonuclease

Fri, 2016-09-02 11:00

The use of the DNA duplex as a supramolecular scaffold is an established approach for the assembly of chromophore aggregates. In the absence of detailed structural insight, the characterization of thus assembled oligochromophores is, today, largely based on solution-phase spectroscopy. Here, we describe the crystal structures of three DNA-organized chromophore aggregates. DNA hybrids containing non-nucleosidic pyrene and phenanthrene building blocks were co-crystallized with the recently described binding domain of the restriction enzyme BpuJI. Crystal structures of these complexes were determined at 2.7, 1.9 and 1.6 Å resolutions. The structures reveal aromatic stacking interactions between pyrene and/or phenanthrene units within the framework of the B-DNA duplex. In hybrids containing a single modification in each DNA strand near the end of the duplex, the two polyaromatic hydrocarbons are engaged in a face-to-face stacking orientation. Due to crystal packing and steric effects, the terminal GC base pair is disrupted in all three crystal structures, which results in a non-perfect stacking arrangement of the aromatic chromophores in two of the structures. In a hybrid containing a total of three pyrenes, crystal lattice induced end-to-end stacking of individual DNA duplexes leads to the formation of an extended aromatic -stack containing four co-axially arranged pyrenes. The aromatic planes of the stacked pyrenes are oriented in a parallel way. The study demonstrates the value of co-crystallization of chemically modified DNA with the recombinant binding domain of the restriction enzyme BpuJI for obtaining detailed structural insight into DNA-assembled oligochromophores.

Cyclic mismatch binding ligand CMBL4 binds to the 5'-T-3'/5'-GG-3' site by inducing the flipping out of thymine base

Fri, 2016-09-02 11:00

A newly designed cyclic bis-naphthyridine carbamate dimer CMBL4 with a limited conformational flexibility was synthesized and characterized. Absorption spectra revealed that two naphthyridines in CMBL4 were stacked on each other in aqueous solutions. The most efficient binding of CMBL4 to DNA was observed for the sequence 5'-T-3'/5'-GG-3' (T/GG) with the formation of a 1:1 complex, which is one of possible structural elements involved in the higher order structures of (TGG)n repeat DNA triggering the genome microdeletion. Surface plasmon resonance assay also showed the binding of CMBL4 with TGG repeat DNA. Potassium permanganate oxidation studies of CMBL4-bound duplex containing the T/GG site showed that the CMBL4-binding accelerated the oxidation of thymine at that site, which suggests the flipping out of the thymine base from a -stack. Preferential binding was observed for CMBL4 compared with its acyclic variants, which suggests the marked significance of the macrocyclic structure for the recognition of the T/GG site.

Free energy analysis and mechanism of base pair stacking in nicked DNA

Fri, 2016-09-02 11:00

The equilibrium of stacked and unstacked base pairs is of central importance for all nucleic acid structure formation processes. The stacking equilibrium is influenced by intramolecular interactions between nucleosides but also by interactions with the solvent. Realistic simulations on nucleic acid structure formation and flexibility require an accurate description of the stacking geometry and stability and its sequence dependence. Free energy simulations have been conducted on a series of double stranded DNA molecules with a central strand break (nick) in one strand. The change in free energy upon unstacking was calculated for all ten possible base pair steps using umbrella sampling along a center-of-mass separation coordinate and including a comparison of different water models. Comparison to experimental studies indicates qualitative agreement of the stability order but a general overestimation of base pair stacking interactions in the simulations. A significant dependence of calculated nucleobase stacking free energies on the employed water model was observed with the tendency of stacking free energies being more accurately reproduced by more complex water models. The simulation studies also suggest a mechanism of stacking/unstacking that involves significant motions perpendicular to the reaction coordinate and indicate that the equilibrium nicked base pair step may slightly differ from regular B-DNA geometry in a sequence-dependent manner.

Insertion sequence-caused large-scale rearrangements in the genome of Escherichia coli

Fri, 2016-09-02 11:00

A majority of large-scale bacterial genome rearrangements involve mobile genetic elements such as insertion sequence (IS) elements. Here we report novel insertions and excisions of IS elements and recombination between homologous IS elements identified in a large collection of Escherichia coli mutation accumulation lines by analysis of whole genome shotgun sequencing data. Based on 857 identified events (758 IS insertions, 98 recombinations and 1 excision), we estimate that the rate of IS insertion is 3.5 x 10–4 insertions per genome per generation and the rate of IS homologous recombination is 4.5 x 10–5 recombinations per genome per generation. These events are mostly contributed by the IS elements IS1, IS2, IS5 and IS186. Spatial analysis of new insertions suggest that transposition is biased to proximal insertions, and the length spectrum of IS-caused deletions is largely explained by local hopping. For any of the ISs studied there is no region of the circular genome that is favored or disfavored for new insertions but there are notable hotspots for deletions. Some elements have preferences for non-coding sequence or for the beginning and end of coding regions, largely explained by target site motifs. Interestingly, transposition and deletion rates remain constant across the wild-type and 12 mutant E. coli lines, each deficient in a distinct DNA repair pathway. Finally, we characterized the target sites of four IS families, confirming previous results and characterizing a highly specific pattern at IS186 target-sites, 5'-GGGG(N6/N7)CCCC-3'. We also detected 48 long deletions not involving IS elements.

Elucidation of transcriptome-wide microRNA binding sites in human cardiac tissues by Ago2 HITS-CLIP

Fri, 2016-09-02 11:00

MicroRNAs (miRs) have emerged as key biological effectors in human health and disease. These small noncoding RNAs are incorporated into Argonaute (Ago) proteins, where they direct post-transcriptional gene silencing via base-pairing with target transcripts. Although miRs have become intriguing biological entities and attractive therapeutic targets, the translational impacts of miR research remain limited by a paucity of empirical miR targeting data, particularly in human primary tissues. Here, to improve our understanding of the diverse roles miRs play in cardiovascular function and disease, we applied high-throughput methods to globally profile miR:target interactions in human heart tissues. We deciphered Ago2:RNA interactions using crosslinking immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (HITS-CLIP) to generate the first transcriptome-wide map of miR targeting events in human myocardium, detecting 4000 cardiac Ago2 binding sites across >2200 target transcripts. Our initial exploration of this interactome revealed an abundance of miR target sites in gene coding regions, including several sites pointing to new miR-29 functions in regulating cardiomyocyte calcium, growth and metabolism. Also, we uncovered several clinically-relevant interactions involving common genetic variants that alter miR targeting events in cardiomyopathy-associated genes. Overall, these data provide a critical resource for bolstering translational miR research in heart, and likely beyond.

Single molecule microscopy reveals mechanistic insight into RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex assembly and transcriptional activity

Fri, 2016-09-02 11:00

Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a complex process that requires general transcription factors and Pol II to assemble on DNA into preinitiation complexes that can begin RNA synthesis upon binding of NTPs (nucleoside triphosphate). The pathways by which preinitiation complexes form, and how this impacts transcriptional activity are not completely clear. To address these issues, we developed a single molecule system using TIRF (total internal reflection fluorescence) microscopy and purified human transcription factors, which allows us to visualize transcriptional activity at individual template molecules. We see that stable interactions between polymerase II (Pol II) and a heteroduplex DNA template do not depend on general transcription factors; however, transcriptional activity is highly dependent upon TATA-binding protein, TFIIB and TFIIF. We also found that subsets of general transcription factors and Pol II can form stable complexes that are precursors for functional transcription complexes upon addition of the remaining factors and DNA. Ultimately we found that Pol II, TATA-binding protein, TFIIB and TFIIF can form a quaternary complex in the absence of promoter DNA, indicating that a stable network of interactions exists between these proteins independent of promoter DNA. Single molecule studies can be used to learn how different modes of preinitiation complex assembly impact transcriptional activity.

HMGN proteins modulate chromatin regulatory sites and gene expression during activation of naïve B cells

Fri, 2016-09-02 11:00

The activation of naïve B lymphocyte involves rapid and major changes in chromatin organization and gene expression; however, the complete repertoire of nuclear factors affecting these genomic changes is not known. We report that HMGN proteins, which bind to nucleosomes and affect chromatin structure and function, co-localize with, and maintain the intensity of DNase I hypersensitive sites genome wide, in resting but not in activated B cells. Transcription analyses of resting and activated B cells from wild-type and Hmgn–/– mice, show that loss of HMGNs dampens the magnitude of the transcriptional response and alters the pattern of gene expression during the course of B-cell activation; defense response genes are most affected at the onset of activation. Our study provides insights into the biological function of the ubiquitous HMGN chromatin binding proteins and into epigenetic processes that affect the fidelity of the transcriptional response during the activation of B cell lymphocytes.

Cooperation between SAGA and SWI/SNF complexes is required for efficient transcriptional responses regulated by the yeast MAPK Slt2

Fri, 2016-09-02 11:00

The transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to cell wall stress is mainly mediated by the cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway through the MAPK Slt2 and the transcription factor Rlm1. Once activated, Rlm1 interacts with the chromatin remodeling SWI/SNF complex which locally alters nucleosome positioning at the target promoters. Here we show that the SAGA complex plays along with the SWI/SNF complex an important role for eliciting both early induction and sustained gene expression upon stress. Gcn5 co-regulates together with Swi3 the majority of the CWI transcriptional program, except for a group of genes which are only dependent on the SWI/SNF complex. SAGA subunits are recruited to the promoter of CWI-responsive genes in a Slt2, Rlm1 and SWI/SNF-dependent manner. However, Gcn5 mediates acetylation and nucleosome eviction only at the promoters of the SAGA-dependent genes. This process is not essential for pre-initiation transcriptional complex assembly but rather increase the extent of the remodeling mediated by SWI/SNF. As a consequence, H3 eviction and Rlm1 recruitment is completely blocked in a swi3 gcn5 double mutant. Therefore, SAGA complex, through its histone acetylase activity, cooperates with the SWI/SNF complex for the mandatory nucleosome displacement required for full gene expression through the CWI pathway.

Setd1a and NURF mediate chromatin dynamics and gene regulation during erythroid lineage commitment and differentiation

Fri, 2016-09-02 11:00

The modulation of chromatin structure is a key step in transcription regulation in mammalian cells and eventually determines lineage commitment and differentiation. USF1/2, Setd1a and NURF complexes interact to regulate chromatin architecture in erythropoiesis, but the mechanistic basis for this regulation is hitherto unknown. Here we showed that Setd1a and NURF complexes bind to promoters to control chromatin structural alterations and gene activation in a cell context dependent manner. In human primary erythroid cells USF1/2, H3K4me3 and the NURF complex were significantly co-enriched at transcription start sites of erythroid genes, and their binding was associated with promoter/enhancer accessibility that resulted from nucleosome repositioning. Mice deficient for Setd1a, an H3K4 trimethylase, in the erythroid compartment exhibited reduced Ter119/CD71 positive erythroblasts, peripheral blood RBCs and hemoglobin levels. Loss of Setd1a led to a reduction of promoter-associated H3K4 methylation, inhibition of gene transcription and blockade of erythroid differentiation. This was associated with alterations in NURF complex occupancy at erythroid gene promoters and reduced chromatin accessibility. Setd1a deficiency caused decreased associations between enhancer and promoter looped interactions as well as reduced expression of erythroid genes such as the adult β-globin gene. These data indicate that Setd1a and NURF complexes are specifically targeted to and coordinately regulate erythroid promoter chromatin dynamics during erythroid lineage differentiation.

Establishment of a promoter-based chromatin architecture on recently replicated DNA can accommodate variable inter-nucleosome spacing

Fri, 2016-09-02 11:00

Nucleosomes, the fundamental subunits of eukaryotic chromatin, are organized with respect to transcriptional start sites. A major challenge to the persistence of this organization is the disassembly of nucleosomes during DNA replication. Here, we use complimentary approaches to map the locations of nucleosomes on recently replicated DNA. We find that nucleosomes are substantially realigned with promoters during the minutes following DNA replication. As a result, the nucleosomal landscape is largely re-established before newly replicated chromosomes are partitioned into daughter cells and can serve as a platform for the re-establishment of gene expression programmes. When the supply of histones is disrupted through mutation of the chaperone Caf1, a promoter-based architecture is generated, but with increased inter-nucleosomal spacing. This indicates that the chromatin remodelling enzymes responsible for spacing nucleosomes are capable of organizing nucleosomes with a range of different linker DNA lengths.

Methylation of histone H4 lysine 20 by PR-Set7 ensures the integrity of late replicating sequence domains in Drosophila

Fri, 2016-09-02 11:00

The methylation state of lysine 20 on histone H4 (H4K20) has been linked to chromatin compaction, transcription, DNA repair and DNA replication. Monomethylation of H4K20 (H4K20me1) is mediated by the cell cycle-regulated histone methyltransferase PR-Set7. PR-Set7 depletion in mammalian cells results in defective S phase progression and the accumulation of DNA damage, which has been partially attributed to defects in origin selection and activation. However, these studies were limited to only a handful of mammalian origins, and it remains unclear how PR-Set7 and H4K20 methylation impact the replication program on a genomic scale. We employed genetic, cytological, and genomic approaches to better understand the role of PR-Set7 and H4K20 methylation in regulating DNA replication and genome stability in Drosophila cells. We find that deregulation of H4K20 methylation had no impact on origin activation throughout the genome. Instead, depletion of PR-Set7 and loss of H4K20me1 results in the accumulation of DNA damage and an ATR-dependent cell cycle arrest. Coincident with the ATR-dependent cell cycle arrest, we find increased DNA damage that is specifically limited to late replicating regions of the Drosophila genome, suggesting that PR-Set7-mediated monomethylation of H4K20 is critical for maintaining the genomic integrity of late replicating domains.

DNA compaction by the bacteriophage protein Cox studied on the single DNA molecule level using nanofluidic channels

Fri, 2016-09-02 11:00

The Cox protein from bacteriophage P2 forms oligomeric filaments and it has been proposed that DNA can be wound up around these filaments, similar to how histones condense DNA. We here use fluorescence microscopy to study single DNA–Cox complexes in nanofluidic channels and compare how the Cox homologs from phages P2 and W affect DNA. By measuring the extension of nanoconfined DNA in absence and presence of Cox we show that the protein compacts DNA and that the binding is highly cooperative, in agreement with the model of a Cox filament around which DNA is wrapped. Furthermore, comparing microscopy images for the wild-type P2 Cox protein and two mutants allows us to discriminate between compaction due to filament formation and compaction by monomeric Cox. P2 and W Cox have similar effects on the physical properties of DNA and the subtle, but significant, differences in DNA binding are due to differences in binding affinity rather than binding mode. The presented work highlights the use of single DNA molecule studies to confirm structural predictions from X-ray crystallography. It also shows how a small protein by oligomerization can have great impact on the organization of DNA and thereby fulfill multiple regulatory functions.

Architectural proteins Pita, Zw5,and ZIPIC contain homodimerization domain and support specific long-range interactions in Drosophila

Fri, 2016-09-02 11:00

According to recent models, as yet poorly studied architectural proteins appear to be required for local regulation of enhancer–promoter interactions, as well as for global chromosome organization. Transcription factors ZIPIC, Pita and Zw5 belong to the class of chromatin insulator proteins and preferentially bind to promoters near the TSS and extensively colocalize with cohesin and condensin complexes. ZIPIC, Pita and Zw5 are structurally similar in containing the N-terminal zinc finger-associated domain (ZAD) and different numbers of C2H2-type zinc fingers at the C-terminus. Here we have shown that the ZAD domains of ZIPIC, Pita and Zw5 form homodimers. In Drosophila transgenic lines, these proteins are able to support long-distance interaction between GAL4 activator and the reporter gene promoter. However, no functional interaction between binding sites for different proteins has been revealed, suggesting that such interactions are highly specific. ZIPIC facilitates long-distance stimulation of the reporter gene by GAL4 activator in yeast model system. Many of the genomic binding sites of ZIPIC, Pita and Zw5 are located at the boundaries of topologically associated domains (TADs). Thus, ZAD-containing zinc-finger proteins can be attributed to the class of architectural proteins.

In vivo evidence for translesion synthesis by the replicative DNA polymerase {delta}

Fri, 2016-09-02 11:00

The intolerance of DNA polymerase (Pol) to incorrect base pairing contributes to its extremely high accuracy during replication, but is believed to inhibit translesion synthesis (TLS). However, chicken DT40 cells lacking the POLD3 subunit of Pol are deficient in TLS. Previous genetic and biochemical analysis showed that POLD3 may promote lesion bypass by Pol itself independently of the translesion polymerase Pol of which POLD3 is also a subunit. To test this hypothesis, we have inactivated Pol proofreading in pold3 cells. This significantly restored TLS in pold3 mutants, enhancing dA incorporation opposite abasic sites. Purified proofreading-deficient human Pol holoenzyme performs TLS of abasic sites in vitro much more efficiently than the wild type enzyme, with over 90% of TLS events resulting in dA incorporation. Furthermore, proofreading deficiency enhances the capability of Pol to continue DNA synthesis over UV lesions both in vivo and in vitro. These data support Pol contributing to TLS in vivo and suggest that the mutagenesis resulting from loss of Pol proofreading activity may in part be explained by enhanced lesion bypass.

Role of the Polymerase {epsilon} sub-unit DPB2 in DNA replication, cell cycle regulation and DNA damage response in Arabidopsis

Fri, 2016-09-02 11:00

Faithful DNA replication maintains genome stability in dividing cells and from one generation to the next. This is particularly important in plants because the whole plant body and reproductive cells originate from meristematic cells that retain their proliferative capacity throughout the life cycle of the organism. DNA replication involves large sets of proteins whose activity is strictly regulated, and is tightly linked to the DNA damage response to detect and respond to replication errors or defects. Central to this interconnection is the replicative polymerase DNA Polymerase (Pol ) which participates in DNA replication per se, as well as replication stress response in animals and in yeast. Surprisingly, its function has to date been little explored in plants, and notably its relationship with DNA Damage Response (DDR) has not been investigated. Here, we have studied the role of the largest regulatory sub-unit of Arabidopsis DNA Pol : DPB2, using an over-expression strategy. We demonstrate that excess accumulation of the protein impairs DNA replication and causes endogenous DNA stress. Furthermore, we show that Pol dysfunction has contrasting outcomes in vegetative and reproductive cells and leads to the activation of distinct DDR pathways in the two cell types.

Widespread transcriptional gene inactivation initiated by a repair intermediate of 8-oxoguanine

Fri, 2016-09-02 11:00

DNA damage can significantly modulate expression of the affected genes either by direct structural interference with transcription components or as a collateral outcome of cellular repair attempts. Thus, DNA glycosylases of the base excision repair (BER) pathway have been implicated in negative transcriptional response to several spontaneously generated DNA base modifications, including a common oxidative DNA base modification 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). Here, we report that single 8-oxoG situated in the non-transcribed DNA strand of a reporter gene has a pronounced negative effect on transcription, driven by promoters of various strength and with different structural properties, including viral, human, and artificial promoters. We further show that the magnitude of the negative effect on the gene expression correlates with excision of the modified base by OGG1 in all promoter constructs tested. Moreover, by using expression vectors with nuclease resistant backbone modifications, we demonstrate that OGG1 does not catalyse DNA strand cleavage in vivo. Rather, cleavage of the phosphate bond 5' to 8-oxodG (catalysed by APE1) is essential and universally required for the onset of transcriptional silencing, regardless of the promoter structure. Hence, induction of transcriptional silencing emerges as a ubiquitous mode of biological response to 8-oxoG in DNA.

The structure and duplex context of DNA interstrand crosslinks affects the activity of DNA polymerase {eta}

Fri, 2016-09-02 11:00

Several important anti-tumor agents form DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs), but their clinical efficiency is counteracted by multiple complex DNA repair pathways. All of these pathways require unhooking of the ICL from one strand of a DNA duplex by nucleases, followed by bypass of the unhooked ICL by translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerases. The structures of the unhooked ICLs remain unknown, yet the position of incisions and processing of the unhooked ICLs significantly influence the efficiency and fidelity of bypass by TLS polymerases. We have synthesized a panel of model unhooked nitrogen mustard ICLs to systematically investigate how the state of an unhooked ICL affects pol activity. We find that duplex distortion induced by a crosslink plays a crucial role in translesion synthesis, and length of the duplex surrounding an unhooked ICL critically affects polymerase efficiency. We report the synthesis of a putative ICL repair intermediate that mimics the complete processing of an unhooked ICL to a single crosslinked nucleotide, and find that it provides only a minimal obstacle for DNA polymerases. Our results raise the possibility that, depending on the structure and extent of processing of an ICL, its bypass may not absolutely require TLS polymerases.

An increase in negative supercoiling in bacteria reveals topology-reacting gene clusters and a homeostatic response mediated by the DNA topoisomerase I gene

Fri, 2016-09-02 11:00

We studied the transcriptional response to an increase in DNA supercoiling in Streptococcus pneumoniae by using seconeolitsine, a new topoisomerase I inhibitor. A homeostatic response allowing recovery of supercoiling was observed in cells treated with subinhibitory seconeolitsine concentrations. Supercoiling increases of 40.7% (6 μM) and 72.9% (8 μM) were lowered to 8.5% and 44.1%, respectively. Likewise, drug removal facilitated the recovery of cell viability and DNA-supercoiling. Transcription of topoisomerase I depended on the supercoiling level. Also specific binding of topoisomerase I to the gyrase A gene promoter was detected by chromatin-immunoprecipitation. The transcriptomic response to 8 μM seconeolitsine had two stages. An early stage, associated to an increase in supercoiling, affected 10% of the genome. A late stage, manifested by supercoiling recovery, affected 2% of the genome. Nearly 25% of the early responsive genes formed 12 clusters with a coordinated transcription. Clusters were 6.7–31.4 kb in length and included 9–22 responsive genes. These clusters partially overlapped with those observed under DNA relaxation, suggesting that bacteria manage supercoiling stress using pathways with common components. This is the first report of a coordinated global transcriptomic response that is triggered by an increase in DNA supercoiling in bacteria.

Cooperative stabilization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis rrnAP3 promoter open complexes by RbpA and CarD

Fri, 2016-09-02 11:00

The essential mycobacterial transcriptional regulators RbpA and CarD act to modulate transcription by associating to the initiation complex and increasing the flux of transcript production. Each of these factors interacts directly with the promoter DNA template and with RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme. We recently reported on the energetics of CarD-mediated open complex stabilization on the Mycobacterium tuberculosis rrnAP3 ribosomal promoter using a stopped-flow fluorescence assay. Here, we apply this approach to RbpA and show that RbpA stabilizes RNAP-promoter open complexes (RPo) via a distinct mechanism from that of CarD. Furthermore, concentration-dependent stopped-flow experiments with both factors reveal positive linkage (cooperativity) between RbpA and CarD with regard to their ability to stabilize RPo. The observation of positive linkage between RbpA and CarD demonstrates that the two factors can act on the same transcription initiation complex simultaneously. Lastly, with both factors present, the kinetics of open complex formation is significantly faster than in the presence of either factor alone and approaches that of E. coli RNAP on the same promoter. This work provides a quantitative framework for the molecular mechanisms of these two essential transcription factors and the critical roles they play in the biology and pathology of mycobacteria.

Annexin A2 facilitates endocytic trafficking of antisense oligonucleotides

Fri, 2016-09-02 11:00

Chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) designed to mediate site-specific cleavage of RNA by RNase H1 are used as research tools and as therapeutics. ASOs modified with phosphorothioate (PS) linkages enter cells via endocytotic pathways. The mechanisms by which PS-ASOs are released from membrane-enclosed endocytotic organelles to reach target RNAs remain largely unknown. We recently found that annexin A2 (ANXA2) co-localizes with PS-ASOs in late endosomes (LEs) and enhances ASO activity. Here, we show that co-localization of ANXA2 with PS-ASO is not dependent on their direct interactions or mediated by ANXA2 partner protein S100A10. Instead, ANXA2 accompanies the transport of PS-ASOs to LEs, as ANXA2/PS-ASO co-localization was observed inside LEs. Although ANXA2 appears not to affect levels of PS-ASO internalization, ANXA2 reduction caused significant accumulation of ASOs in early endosomes (EEs) and reduced localization in LEs and decreased PS-ASO activity. Importantly, the kinetics of PS-ASO activity upon free uptake show that target mRNA reduction occurs at least 4 hrs after PS-ASOs exit from EEs and is coincident with release from LEs. Taken together, our results indicate that ANXA2 facilitates PS-ASO trafficking from early to late endosomes where it may also contribute to PS-ASO release.